Guy Fawkes!

Bling here! Someone said it is nearly Guy Fawkes Day! I’m not sure what this means but I think I remember last year there were lots of scary loud noises and sometimes bright flashes in the sky. I was lucky I was safe in my bed at Cahill’s; it would have been very scary to be outside with all those loud noises and bright lights.

 

For young pets, there are a few different techniques you can use to make it a normal part of everyday life for your pet. There are noise CDs that you can get, which have a variety of noises that could potentially be frightening for them. This is good to have on in the background during the day while you are at home and making it seem like an everyday part of life.

 

When your young pet hears a loud noise or is frightened of something, it is a good idea not to fuss over your pet too much because if you do it will make your pet think you were also frightened so he/she should be too. When he/she comes running up looking worried, just say (in a normal tone) “it's alright” and then carry on with what you were doing.

 

Some signs that your dog is fearful include:

 

 

There are many things you can do at home if you know your pet is very frightened of the noises of fireworks. Make sure your pets are in a safe and secure environment at all times so when the sudden noises begin they can not escape and run away.

 

You could have some background noise such as music or the radio, so when the fireworks go off they are not as noticable.

 

Just before sunset, you can move your pet to a dark room that has familiar things such as toys and blankets. This will help with the scary flashing lights and make him/her feel more comfortable surrounded by familiar things.

 

When the noises are happening, you could try to play a game or do some training, remembering not to show any fear or worry while doing this.

 

If you know of a pet that is not worried about the noises and they get along with your pet, it can be a good idea to get them to hang out together for the night so the scared pet can see there is nothing to worry about.

 

There are other options out there also, such as drugs to calm your pet. This would require a visit to the vet clinic to make sure it is safe for your pet to have this.

 

There is also a diffuser called Adaptil that contains the Dog Appeasing Pheromone, which should be plugged into a power socket for a week before the fireworks season. This diffuser contains a pheromone that is found in all lactating bitches between 3-5 days after giving birth, that triggers the dog's brain to believe things are familiar and complements the dog's natural relaxation mechanisms and therefore make the dog feel like everything is normal and there is no need for worry. A similar type of calming aid called Feliway, is available for our feline companions. Find out more about the calming aids available over the counter at our clinic here.

 

For more information, please don't hesitate to call us at 06 3588675 to discuss your concerns.

 

 

Page last updated by Cahill Animal Hospital 14 March 2016.

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